Some people eat a lot after working out—and thus don’t lose weight—because they use food as a reward for their exertion. Framing the workout as “fun,” however, can negate this effect, according to a series of experiments done at Cornell University and reported in Marketing Letters. In the first one, 56 women did a one-mile walk, followed by an all-you-can eat...
Should people with osteoarthritis avoid running, jumping, and other high-impact exercise? Yes, as a general rule, but it depends on the severity of the osteoarthritis (OA), which joints are affected, and other factors. OA occurs when the protective cartilage on the ends of bones breaks down over time and is unable to adequately repair and renew itself. Physical activity is important...
What if all it takes to get a good workout is 7 minutes? Would you still say you have no time to exercise? Ultra-short workout routines are referred to in the exercise literature as “low-volume.” If the exercises are done very intensely, in bouts separated by short rest periods, it’s called “low-volume, high-intensity interval training.” And that’s what the...

Cycling Soreness

If bicycle riding is a sore subject, try raising the handlebars. Pressure from the saddle can cause numbness and pain in the genitals and perineum (between the genitals and anus) as well as nerve damage and sexual dysfunction, not just in men, but also in women. As shown in a study in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, which included 48 women cyclists, handlebars that...
Physical exercise is good for the brain, with studies showing that it benefits people with normal age-related cognitive losses, those with mild cognitive impairment and possibly even people with dementia. A recent study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine has now found that virtual-reality exercise, sometimes called exergaming, enhances brain power in older people even better than traditional exercise. If you’re not...